After the Storm

Anybody else catch the Today programme this morning? I was lying in bed in my normal semi-comatose fashion self-administering caffeine, when the headline caught my ears that ‘travel chaos was continuing’ after the storm, and that ‘travellers should check before setting off to the station avoid disappointment’ (my relationship with trains in this country is one of continual disappointment, but never mind). At that point they excitedly went over to their transport correspondent in Paddington for a live update. ‘So,’ Jim Humphrys or John Naughtie or whoever it was asked her, ‘scenes of chaos there?’. Er, no, was her reply. All the trains were running fine with no delays. As were the planes. And the Eurostar. As a breaking news story, this was beginning to resemble the Great Dwarf Shortage of 1994 in its total lack of import. Finally, their hapless correspondent managed to dredge up the fact that GNER and Virgin trains were suffering some delays – Virgin Train Delays, the Dog Bites Man of transport news stories – and they put her out of her misery and went back to obsessing about who called whom what on Celebrity Big Brother. I took a calculated risk and didn’t check before setting off to Vauxhall, where the sum total of the promised chaos was the 7:41 running three minutes late and a slight delay at the news stand before I could pay for my paper.

I think the lesson we can learn from this is that if you’re the transport correspondent of the Today programme, you should think very carefully before calling in and using ‘train chaos’ as your excuse for getting in late in the morning. One of these days they’re going to call your bluff and put you on live before the bleary ears of the entire nation.

Advertisements

3 responses to “After the Storm

  1. The second lesson is that the BBC component parts feed off each other in a Big Brother sort of way-the Weather Centre promises chaos and some times gets it right. When it does the Today programme has two choices(a) ignore the weather and interview Gordon Brown (b) exaggerate the chaos and take vicarous credit for it; and interview Gordon Brown. . And BTW one should not diminish the significance of the Great Dwarf Shortage of 1994. It meant a postponement of the re-make of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory as they could not find a new generation of Oompah Loompahs. Tragic really

  2. Have a good weekend.

  3. Flighty – thanks

    Huttonian – not to mention a whole generation of children growing up on pantomimes entitled ‘Snow White and the Dwarf’

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s